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  • Published: 22 February 2021
  • ISBN: 9781760642105
  • Imprint: Australian Foreign Affairs
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 144
  • RRP: $26.00

The March of Autocracy; Australia's Fateful Choices; Australian Foreign Affairs 11



In the face of a rising authoritarian Asia and a declining democratic West, can democracy fight back?

“China is an emergent empire of a kind never seen before . . . It’s not a gunpowder or dreadnought battleship or B-52 bomber empire. It’s an information empire, propelled by commercial interests.” JOHN KEANE

The eleventh issue of Australian Foreign Affairs examines the rise of authoritarian and illiberal leaders, whose growing assertiveness is reshaping the Western-led world order. The March of Autocracy explores the challenge for Australia as it enters a new era, in which China’s sway increases and democracies compete with their rivals for global influence.

John Keane probes Western misconceptions about China to show why its emerging empire might be more resilient than believed.
Natasha Kassam & Darren Lim explore how Xi’s China model is reshaping the global order.
Sam Roggeveen considers Washington’s stance on China and whether Biden can seek to restore US primacy.
Linda Jaivin discusses how Australia might use its strengths as a middle power to combat China’s influence.
Huong Le Thu suggests how Australia can improve its South-East Asian ties.
Kate Geraghty lays bare the horrific impact that war can have on women.
Melissa Conley Tyler reveals the crippling impact of Australia’s underfunding of diplomacy.

PLUS Correspondence on AFA10: Friends, Allies and Enemies from Charles Edel, Rikki Kersten and more.

  • Published: 22 February 2021
  • ISBN: 9781760642105
  • Imprint: Australian Foreign Affairs
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 144
  • RRP: $26.00

About the author

Jonathan Pearlman

Jonathan Pearlman is the editor of Australian Foreign Affairs and is a correspondent for the Telegraph (UK) and the Straits Times (Singapore). He previously worked at the Sydney Morning Herald, covering foreign affairs and politics from Canberra and Sydney. He has worked as a correspondent in the Middle East, as well as covering various international stories, including the 2008 US election and the violence in eastern Congo. His work has appeared in numerous publications, including The Diplomat, Good Weekend, and the Australian Book Review, and he has been a Walkley Award finalist and United Nations Media Award winner. He was born in Sydney and studied at the University of New South Wales and Oxford University.

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