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In Other Words
  • Published: 1 December 2008
  • ISBN: 9780141900438
  • Imprint: Penguin eBooks
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 128

In Other Words



In Other Words - a hilarious book of verse, anecdotes and memories by John Mortimer

From one of Britain's greatest ever raconteurs, these are the stories with which John Mortimer entertained the nation for years: of seedy criminals and the even seedier criminal justice system, of boyhood and his remarkable father, of passion and politics, and most of all English eccentrics from Lord Byron to the present day. Along the way, we meet a motley crew of failed murderers, remorseful drunkards, unrepentant adulterers and cantankerous judges. And interspersed among these humorous vignettes is a wonderful selection of English (and some American) poetry, which beautifully complements the stories.

In Other Words is the record of an extraordinary life lived in law and literature, and a story of England and Englishness. If you like P.G. Wodehouse you will love this book.

Sir John Mortimer was a barrister, playwright and novelist. His fictional trilogy about the inexorable rise of an ambitious Tory MP in the Thatcher years (Paradise Postponed, Titmuss Regained and The Sound of Trumpets) has recently been republished in Penguin Classics, together with Clinging to the Wreckage and his play A Voyage round My Father. His most famous creation was the barrister Horace Rumpole, who featured in four novels and around eighty short stories. His books in Penguin include: The Anti-social Behaviour of Horace Rumpole; The Collected Stories of Rumpole; The First Rumpole Omnibus; Rumpole and the Angel of Death; Rumpole and the Penge Bungalow Murders; Rumpole and the Primrose Path; Rumpole and the Reign of Terror; Rumpole and the Younger Generation; Rumpole at Christmas; Rumpole Rests His Case; The Second Rumpole Omnibus; Forever Rumpole; In Other Words; Quite Honestly and Summer's Lease.
%%%In Other Words - a hilarious book of verse, anecdotes and memories by John Mortimer
From one of Britain's greatest ever raconteurs, these are the stories with which John Mortimer entertained the nation for years: of seedy criminals and the even seedier criminal justice system, of boyhood and his remarkable father, of passion and politics, and most of all English eccentrics from Lord Byron to the present day. Along the way, we meet a motley crew of failed murderers, remorseful drunkards, unrepentant adulterers and cantankerous judges. And interspersed among these humorous vignettes is a wonderful selection of English (and some American) poetry, which beautifully complements the stories.
In Other Words is the record of an extraordinary life lived in law and literature, and a story of England and Englishness. If you like P.G. Wodehouse you will love this book.
Sir John Mortimer was a barrister, playwright and novelist. His fictional trilogy about the inexorable rise of an ambitious Tory MP in the Thatcher years (Paradise Postponed, Titmuss Regained and The Sound of Trumpets) has recently been republished in Penguin Classics, together with Clinging to the Wreckage and his play A Voyage round My Father. His most famous creation was the barrister Horace Rumpole, who featured in four novels and around eighty short stories. His books in Penguin include: The Anti-social Behaviour of Horace Rumpole; The Collected Stories of Rumpole; The First Rumpole Omnibus; Rumpole and the Angel of Death; Rumpole and the Penge Bungalow Murders; Rumpole and the Primrose Path; Rumpole and the Reign of Terror; Rumpole and the Younger Generation; Rumpole at Christmas; Rumpole Rests His Case; The Second Rumpole Omnibus; Forever Rumpole; In Other Words; Quite Honestly and Summer's Lease.

  • Published: 1 December 2008
  • ISBN: 9780141900438
  • Imprint: Penguin eBooks
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 128

About the author

John Mortimer

John Mortimer was born on 21 April 1923. His father was a successful divorce lawyer, and was to be a considerable influence on his son's life. Schooled at Harrow, Mortimer went on to study law at Brasenose College, Oxford. On finishing his degree, he was called to the Bar in 1948 and entered his father's chambers. At first he followed his father and specialised in divorce cases, but he soon switched to criminal law, as he maintained that murderers and the like were nicer to work with than divorcing spouses. In 1966 he became a Queen's Counsel, and he continued to work as a barrister until 1979. A lifelong champion of free speech, he has argued for the defence in some of the most famous obscenity trials in Britain, including the one brought against the underground magazine Oz for its notorious 'School Kids' issue. John Mortimer started writing before he became a barrister. His legal career inspired his fiction, however, with his first radio play, The Dock Brief (1957) dealing with the subject of an ageing barrister who is asked to defend a man accused of murdering his wife. It won the Italia Prize and was adapted for the stage, television and a film starring Peter Sellers and Richard Attenborough. He also had great success with his autobiographical play A Voyage Round My Father, which ran in the West End starring Jeremy Brett and Alec Guinness. It was subsequently adapted for TV starring Sir Laurence Olivier and Alan Bates. He first wrote about Rumpole in a BBC TV Play for Today called Rumpole of the Bailey. Centring on a lovable Old Bailey hack with a penchant for cigars and claret and a domineering wife, She Who Must Be Obeyed, the play was an instant hit, and in 1978 the first Thames Television series was aired under the same name, starring Leo McKern as Rumpole. It became hugely popular, and five more series followed. The first collection of Rumpole stories was published in 1978, and was followed by a further twelve volumes. His other novels include the trilogy of Titmuss novels, Paradise Postponed, Titmuss Regained and The Sound of Trumpets, and he has also written three volumes of autobiography (Clinging to the Wreckage, Murderers and Other Friends and Summer of a Dormouse) and numerous TV and film adaptations, including Brideshead Revisited, Cider with Rosie and Tea with Mussolini. John Mortimer received a knighthood for his services to the arts in 1998 in the Queen's birthday honours list. He died in 2009.

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