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About the book
  • Published: 16 December 2013
  • ISBN: 9781775530510
  • Imprint: Random House New Zealand
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 240

Jake's Long Shadow


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The third volume in the hard-hitting, best-selling Once Were Warriors trilogy.

The third volume in the hard-hitting, best-selling Once Were Warriors trilogy.

The millennium has changed but have the Hekes? Where are they now, Beth, Jake, and what of their other children? Son Abe who has rejected violence but violence finds him. Polly, as beautiful as her sister Grace, who committed suicide; is that a Heke running around with the wealthy polo-playing set and growing rich herself? And the gang leader, Apeman, who killed Tania, what's prison like, does it change a man, grow him or not?

We meet another tragic female figure, Sharneeta. And Alistair Trambert, a middle-class white boy sunk into the same welfare dependency trap as the Maoris his class criticises. Meet Charlie Bennett, Beth's husband, a fine man, and yet . . . And yet there's Jake Heke, casting his long shadow over everyone. Has he really grown up?

  • Pub date: 16 December 2013
  • ISBN: 9781775530510
  • Imprint: Random House New Zealand
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 240

About the Author

Alan Duff

Alan Duff was born in Rotorua in 1950. He has written novels, including Once Were Warriors, One Night Out Stealing and What Becomes of the Broken Hearted?, a novella (State Ward), several children’s books and a number of non-fiction works. Once Were Warriors won the Pen Best First Book of Fiction Award and What Becomes of the Broken Hearted? won the Montana New Zealand Book Award for Fiction. Both novels were made into internationally acclaimed films.

Duff was the driving force behind the Books in Homes scheme, which, with commercial sponsorship and government support, aims to break the cycle of illiteracy, poverty, anger and violence among underprivileged children by providing books for them to own.

The New Zealand Listener claimed that Duff’s debut, Once Were Warriors, ‘bursts upon the literary landscape with all the noise and power of a new volcano’, while acclaimed writer Witi Ihimaera wrote, ‘This is the Haka, the rage of a people who, yes, once were warriors . . . A kick to the guts of New Zealand’s much-vaunted pride in its Maori/Pakeha race relations. A breathless fearless debut.’

The Sydney Morning Herald regarded the sequel, What Becomes of the Broken Hearted?, as ‘a masterpiece’: ‘powerful, authentic, moving, brilliantly written . . . a profound and passionate novel . . . a memorable experience’. The Australian praised its ‘universal truths to be savoured for their poetic insight’, while the Canberra Times called it ‘a brilliant work . . . poetic and full of hope’.

The New Zealand Listener wrote that What Becomes of the Broken Hearted? ‘carries the story on with doubled brilliance. The new book is just as dynamic, just as in-your-face as the first one, but less violent, more layered, more fundamentally thoughtful and challenging.’

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Praise for Jake's Long Shadow

“With the same skill that he demonstrated in Broken Hearted, Duff weaves together a multitude of storylines and voices so we see all sides of this fractured community. . . . while this one has moments as shockingly violent as Warriors and Broken Hearted, there is a quietness that is slowly layering itself over the gore. . . New Zealanders can be awfully polite when it comes to expressing ideas or passionate opinions. Well, there is nothing polite about Duff: he's out there, stirring us all up, tearing down shibboleths, facing up to public opinion with great courage, armed only with his mighty weapon, the written word. . . . Duff is revealed as an eloquent optimist, a powerful advocate for the possibility of individual transformation. Whether his work will be read by the people who could most benefit - those still trapped in that social wasteland of Once Were Warriors - is doubtful, as Duff acknowledges. But for the rest of us, it makes extraordinarily compelling reading.”

Margie Thomson, NZ Herald


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