> Skip to content
Origin Of The Species
About the book
  • Published: 15 October 2003
  • ISBN: 9781857152586
  • Imprint: Everyman
  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 1024
  • RRP: $55.00
Categories:

Origin Of The Species


Formats & editions


' I feel most deeply that this whole question of Creation is too profound for human intellect. A dog might as well speculate on the mind of Newton! Let each man hope and believe what he can' Charles Darwin, 1862.



Introduction is by Richard Dawkins

When the eminent naturalist Charles Darwin returned from South America on board the H.M.S Beagle in 1836, he brought with him the notes and evidence which would form the basis of his landmark theory of evolution of species by a process of natural selection. This theory, published as The Origin of Species in 1859, is the basis of modern biology and the concept of biodiversity. It also sparked a fierce scientific, religious and philosophical debate which still continues today.

  • Pub date: 15 October 2003
  • ISBN: 9781857152586
  • Imprint: Everyman
  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 1024
  • RRP: $55.00

About the Author

Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin was born on February 12, 1809 in Shropshire, England. He was educated at Edinburgh University and Christ's College, Cambridge. Between 1831 and 1836 he travelled in South America aboard the H.M.S Beagle to explore the geology and natural history of the area, and published his journal of findings in 1839. His most famous book On the Origin of the Species by Means of Natural Selection, appeared in 1859 and is arguably one of the most important scientific works ever published. The theories of evolution and natural selection proposed in this book and The Descent of Man (1871) are still the subject of intense debate and scrutiny today. Charles Darwin died on 19 April, 1882 and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

Also by Charles Darwin

See all

Praise for Origin Of The Species

“The most important book ever written”

New Scientist

“No other book has so transformed how we look at the natural world and mankind's origins”

Sunday Telegraph

“Why does Darwin's theory matter now? Because it is the basis of modern biology and much medical research; it provides a tool with which to understand the natural world; it offers a deeper, if imperfect, understanding of our behaviour, about where we came from and where we might be going”

Observer


Related titles