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About the book
  • Published: 1 December 2010
  • ISBN: 9781407086835
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 288

Brighton Rock




Published to tie-in with a major film starring Helen Mirren and Sam Riley

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY J.M. COETZEE

A gang war is raging through the dark underworld of Brighton. Seventeen-year-old Pinkie, malign and ruthless, has killed a man. Believing he can escape retribution, he is unprepared for the courageous, life-embracing Ida Arnold.Greene's gripping thriller, exposes a world of loneliness and fear, of life lived on the 'dangerous edge of things'.

'In a class by himself-the ultimate chronicler of twentieth-century man's consciousness and anxiety' William Golding, Independent

  • Pub date: 1 December 2010
  • ISBN: 9781407086835
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 288

About the Author

Graham Greene

Graham Greene was born in 1904. He worked as a journalist and critic, and in 1940 became literary editor of the Spectator. He was later employed by the Foreign Office. As well as his many novels, Graham Greene wrote several collections of short stories, four travel books, six plays, three books of autobiography, two of biography and four books for children. He also wrote hundreds of essays, and film and book reviews. Graham Greene was a member of the Order of Merit and a Companion of Honour. He died in April 1991.

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Praise for Brighton Rock

“The most ingenious, inventive and exciting of our novelists, rich in exactly etched and moving portraits of real human beings”

The Times

“A superb storyteller with a gift for provoking controversy”

New York Times

“I read Brighton Rock when I was about thirteen. One of the first lessons I took from it was that a serious novel could be an exciting novel - that the novel of adventure could also be the novel of ideas”

Ian McEwan

“Why does this bleak, seething and anarchic novel still resonate? Its energy and power is that of the rebellious adolescent, foreshadowing the rise of the cult of youth in the latter part of the 20th century.”

Sophia Martelli, Observer


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