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About the book
  • Published: 15 November 2015
  • ISBN: 9781784740412
  • Imprint: Chatto & Windus
  • Format: Trade Paperback
  • Pages: 112
  • RRP: $35.00

Gravel in my Shoe




A tour de force new collection from ‘one of England's finest poets’ (Daily Telegraph)

'The only peace: to know my place
And what I now must do,
Striding with the light full in my face,
And gravel in my shoe.'


Bright, elemental and as dexterously brilliant as ever, John Fuller's latest collection takes as its subject 'our ends and our origins'. Here are songs, serenades, literary cameos, an ode to a golden anniversary, a long letter to an old friend, and two majestic sequences: one dedicated to the Welsh woman of the woods, Mary Price; the other, sun-drenched sonnets that keenly observe the natural world against 'the flavour of our own mortality'.

With wit, warmth and wisdom, Gravel in My Shoe playfully balances the light and shade of life, in full awareness of its passing but with a spring in its step nevertheless. It shows us, ultimately, that 'life is too short, but poetry's eternal'.

  • Pub date: 15 November 2015
  • ISBN: 9781784740412
  • Imprint: Chatto & Windus
  • Format: Trade Paperback
  • Pages: 112
  • RRP: $35.00

About the Author

John Fuller

John Fuller, born in Ashford, Kent, is an acclaimed poet and novelist. His collection Stones and Fires (1996) was awarded the Forward Prize; Ghosts (2004) was shortlisted for the Whitbread Award for Poetry; The Space of Joy (2006) was shortlisted for the Costa Poetry Award, and The Grey Among the Green (1988), Song & Dance (2008) and Pebble & I (2010) were all Poetry Book Society Recommendations. His 1983 novel Flying to Nowhere, a historical fantasy, won the Whitbread First Novel Award and was nominated for the Booker Prize. He has also written collections of short stories and several books for children. He is an Emeritus Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford.

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Praise for Gravel in my Shoe

“The free-wheeling, conversational, frequently didactic tone suits Fuller perfectly, enabling him to comment on art as well as life.”

John Greening, Times Literary Supplement


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