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House Of Orphans
  • Published: 1 March 2007
  • ISBN: 9780141924373
  • Imprint: Penguin eBooks
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 336

House Of Orphans



Helen Dunmore's previous novels, The Siege and Mourning Ruby, sold over 100,000 and 65,000 paperbacks respectively.

Finland, 1902, and the Russian Empire enforces a brutal policy to destroy Finland's freedom and force its people into submission.

Eeva, orphaned daughter of a failed revolutionary, also battles to find her independence and identity. Destitute when her father dies, she is sent away to a country orphanage, and then employed as servant to a widowed doctor, Thomas Eklund. Slowly, Thomas falls in love with Eeva ... but she has committed herself long ago to a boy from her childhood, Lauri, who is now caught up in Helsinki's turmoil of resistance to Russian rule.

Set in dangerous, unfamiliar times which strangely echo our own, the story reveals how terrorism lies hidden within ordinary life, as rulers struggle to hold on to power. House of Orphans is a rich, brilliant story of love, history and change.

  • Published: 1 March 2007
  • ISBN: 9780141924373
  • Imprint: Penguin eBooks
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 336

About the author

Helen Dunmore

Helen Dunmore was an award-winning novelist, children’s author and poet who will be remembered for the depth and breadth of her fiction. Rich and intricate, yet narrated with a deceptive simplicity that made all of her work accessible and heartfelt, her writing stood out for the fluidity and lyricism of her prose, and her extraordinary ability to capture the presence of the past.

Her first novel, Zennor in Darkness, explored the events which led D. H. Lawrence to be expelled from Cornwall on suspicion of spying, and won the McKitterick Prize. Her third novel, A Spell of Winter, won the inaugural Orange Prize for Fiction in 1996, and she went on to become a Sunday Times bestseller with The Siege, which was described by Antony Beevor as a ‘world-class novel’ and was shortlisted for the Whitbread Novel of the Year and the Orange Prize. Published in 2010, her eleventh novel, The Betrayal, was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize and shortlisted for the Orwell Prize and the Commonwealth Writers Prize, and The Lie in 2014 was shortlisted for the Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction and the 2015 RSL Ondaatje Prize.

Her final novel, Birdcage Walk, deals with legacy and recognition – what writers, especially women writers, can expect to leave behind them – and was described by the Observer as ‘the finest novel Helen Dunmore has written’. She died in June 2017, and in January 2018, she was posthumously awarded the Costa Prize for her volume of poetry, Inside the Wave.

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Praise for House Of Orphans

Outstanding, a sheer pleasure to read. Dunmore is a remarkable storyteller

Daily Mail

Part love story, part tragedy . . . Dunmore on dazzling form. Everyone should read her work

Independent on Sunday

Every character is richly drawn and makes for compelling reading ... top-quality fiction

Daily Express

Richly ambitious . . . there isn't a dull page. A remarkable achievement

Scotsman

Extraordinary . . . combines a luminous delicacy of observation with raw emotional power to haunting effect

Sunday Telegraph

Vivid and exciting . . . Dunmore creates a beautiful sense of stillness . . . she conveys a passion for Finland's icy landscape

Observer

Beautifully written . . . a story about us all

Evening Standard

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