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About the book
  • Published: 15 July 2013
  • ISBN: 9780099572190
  • Imprint: Vintage
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 432
  • RRP: $32.99

Injustice

Life and Death in the Courtrooms of America




A man wrongly convicted of murder, a crusading lawyer determined to overturn the death penalty and an investigation that reveals corruption at every turn. This remarkable book reads like a page-turning detective story, with one crucial difference: can we be sure that justice will be served?

Shortlisted for the 2013 Orwell Prize.
THE STORY CONTINUES: TWO NEW CHAPTERS FOR THE PAPERBACK EDITION

In 1986, Kris Maharaj, a British businessman living in Miami, was arrested for the brutal murder of two ex-business associates. His lawyer did not present a strong alibi; Kris was found guilty and sentenced to death in the electric chair.

It wasn't until a young lawyer working for nothing, Clive Stafford Smith, took on his case that strong evidence began to emerge that the state of Florida had got the wrong man on Death Row. So far, so good - except that, as Stafford Smith argues here so compellingly, the American justice system is actually designed to ignore innocence. Twenty-six years later, Maharaj is still in jail.

Step by step, Stafford Smith untangles the Maharaj case and the system that makes disasters like this inevitable. His conclusions will act as a wake-up call for those who condone legislation which threatens basic human rights and, at the same time, the personal story he tells demonstrates that determination can challenge the institutions that surreptitiously threaten our freedom.

  • Pub date: 15 July 2013
  • ISBN: 9780099572190
  • Imprint: Vintage
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 432
  • RRP: $32.99

About the Author

Clive Stafford Smith

Clive Stafford Smith is a lawyer specialising in defending those accused of the most serious crimes, and is founder and Director of UK legal charity Reprieve. Based in the US for twenty-six years, he now works from the UK where he continues to defend prisoners on Death Row, and challenges the continued incarceration of those held in secret prisons around the world. He has secured the release of 65 prisoners from Guantánamo Bay and still acts for fifteen more. His book Bad Men (shortlisted for the 2008 Orwell Prize) described this campaign. Alongside many other awards, in 2000 he received an OBE for 'humanitarian services'. His second book Injustice was shortlisted for the 2013 Orwell Prize and the CWA Non-Fiction Dagger.


Praise for Injustice

“When you need to inspire yourself for the return to work”

Kirsty Brimelow, The Times

“A forensic examination of the murder trial in America of British businessman Kris Mahraj”

Observer


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