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About the book
  • Published: 13 November 2017
  • ISBN: 9780241302484
  • Imprint: Penguin Classics
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 176
  • RRP: $23.00

Nabokov's Dozen




Thirteen strangely wrought stories make up Nabokov's baker's dozen.

In some of these stories shadowy people pass through, cooped up by life, mangled by it, with nowhere to escape to. Their dreams lie stifled, smothered by routine and repetition, and frustrations lurk in all the corners. In others, elusive glimpses of fleeting happiness, which flutter away before they can be snatched, waylay their victims. Like the shimmer of the sea, the gleam of a glass caught by the sun, they sparkle brilliantly only to dissolve again.

Two of the stories, 'First Love' and 'Mademoiselle O', are autobiographical, and 'The Assistant Producer' is based on real events, but the rest are pure flights of fantasy - or the stuff that life is weaved of?

  • Pub date: 13 November 2017
  • ISBN: 9780241302484
  • Imprint: Penguin Classics
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 176
  • RRP: $23.00

About the Author

Vladimir Nabokov

One of the twentieth century's master prose stylists, Vladimir Nabokov (1899 - 1977) was born in St Petersburg, but left Russia when the Bolsheviks seized power. He studied French and Russian literature at Trinity College, Cambridge, then lived in Berlin and Paris, where he launched a brilliant literary career. In 1940 he moved to the United States, and achieved renown as a novelist, poet, critic, and translator. He taught literature at Wellesley, Stanford, Cornell, and Harvard. In 1961 he moved to Montreux, Switzerland, where he died in 1977.

His first novel in English was The Real Life of Sebastian Knight, published in 1941. His other books include Ada or Ardor (1969), Laughter in the Dark (1933), Pale Fire (1962), the short story collection Details of a Sunset (1976) and Lolita (1955), his best-known novel.

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Praise for Nabokov's Dozen

“Nabokov writes prose the only way it should be written, that is, ecstatically”

John Updike

“A Proustian depth of subtlety, sadness and loss”

Sunday Times


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