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About the book
  • Published: 22 March 1996
  • ISBN: 9780099591917
  • Imprint: Vintage
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 320
  • RRP: $26.99
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Searching For Caleb


Formats & editions


One of eight Anne Tyler novels reissued in September 2008 with stunning new jackets in the new series style

Caleb Peck vanished in 1912, a voluntary refugee from an all-embracing Peckness of the Pecks. Sixty-one years later his half brother Daniel is still on trial, helped by his grand-daughter Justine, a character cursed with a Peckish necessity to see every side of a question. The moving search for the family's deepest roots, from the ragtime era at the end of the last century to small town America in the mid seventies is a haunting story about growing up and breaking away, rebellion and acceptance.

  • Pub date: 22 March 1996
  • ISBN: 9780099591917
  • Imprint: Vintage
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 320
  • RRP: $26.99

About the Author

Anne Tyler

Anne Tyler was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1941 and grew up in Raleigh, North Carolina. Her bestselling novels include Breathing Lessons, The Accidental Tourist, Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant, Ladder of Years, Back When We Were Grownups, A Patchwork Planet, The Amateur Marriage, Digging to America, A Spool of Blue Thread and Vinegar Girl.

In 1989 she won the Pulitzer Prize for Breathing Lessons; in 1994 she was nominated by Roddy Doyle and Nick Hornby as 'the greatest novelist writing in English'; in 2012 she received the Sunday Times Award for Literary Excellence; and in 2015 A Spool of Blue Thread was a Sunday Times bestseller and was shortlisted for the Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction and the Man Booker Prize.

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Praise for Searching For Caleb

“Family sagas have such an endless appeal that whenever one meets a really good one, like Anne Tyler's Searching for Caleb, one wonders why anyone bothers to write a different form of novel”

Auberon Waugh

“Anne Tyler is a writer whose special gift is to convey the richness, strangeness and unpredicability of seemingly everyday lives”

Sunday Telegraph

“Strange and enchanting”

The Times


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