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About the book
  • Published: 1 March 2007
  • ISBN: 9781844130948
  • Imprint: Pimlico
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 272
  • RRP: $28.99
Categories:

The House By The Thames

And The People Who Lived There


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A masterpiece of miniaturist, social history. By closely examining the history of one house, Gillian Tindall tells the story of Southwark and the south bank, the river Thames and indeed of London itself.

Just across the River Thames from St Paul's Cathedral stands an old house. It is the last genuine survivor of what was once a long ribbon of elegant houses overlooking the water. Built in the days of Queen Anne, it stands in the footprint of a far older habitation. Once, on this spot, was the Cardinal's Cap, a timbered Tudor inn; its vaulted cellars are still there, beneath the bricks and plaster and panelling of later centuries.Over the course of almost 450 years the dwelling on this site has seen changes on the river and in the city on the opposite bank. From its windows, people have watched the ferrymen ferry Londoners to Shakespeare's Globe; they have gazed on the Great Fire, and seen goods from all corners of the world transported from the Pool below London Bridge. They have watched new bridges rise, and the ships change from sail to steam. They have also seen the countrified lanes of London's marshy south bank give way to a network of wharves, workshops and tenements - and then seen these, too, become dust and empty air. Rich with anecdote and colour, empathetic, scholarly and textured, The House by the Thames is social history at its most enjoyable. Gillian Tindall excels at description and at picking out the most fascinating details. Some of the people who have lived in the house have been skilled; some were prosperous traders in the coal and iron on which Britain's industrial revolution ran. Some were rich and flamboyant; one was an early film star. Others have been among London's numberless poor. All these real people, from the most famous to the most obscure, Gillian Tindall has researched through multiple archives, old newspapers, contemporary accounts and the memories of their descendants. She breathes life into the forgotten names of individuals who were as passionate in their time as we ourselves - and in so doing makes them stand for legions of others and for whole worlds that we have lost through hundreds of years of London's history.

  • Pub date: 1 March 2007
  • ISBN: 9781844130948
  • Imprint: Pimlico
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 272
  • RRP: $28.99
Categories:

About the Author

Gillian Tindall

Gillian Tindall is a master of miniaturist history, well known for the quality of her writing and the scrupulousness of her research; she makes a handful of people, a few locations or a dramatic event stand for the much larger picture, as her seminal book The Fields Beneath, approached the history of Kentish Town, London. She has also written on London's Southbank (The House by the Thames), on southern English counties (Three Houses, Many Lives), and the Left Bank (Footprints in Paris), amongst other locations, as well as biography and prize-winning novels. Her latest book, The Tunnel through Time, traces the history of the Crossrail route, the forthcoming ‘Elizabeth’ line. She has lived in the same London house for over fifty years.

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Praise for The House By The Thames

“Mesmeric... This book is not just for London enthusiasts. Tindall has demonstrated a genius for a certain kind of social history that, in shining a light on one small place, illuminated a huge amount around... A rare instance of a history book that, in its optimism about the indomitable spirit of the place, raises the hairs on the back of your neck.”

Sinclair McKay, Sunday Telegraph

“Fascinating... Gillian Tindall brilliantly deploys contemporary observations to bring the centuries alive.”

Christopher Howse, Tablet

“Delightful... Tindall's story is truthful and unexaggerated, combining elegantly elegiac prose with imaginative empathy and descriptive power.”

Jessica Mann, Literary Review


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