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About the book
  • Published: 13 June 2016
  • ISBN: 9780241965993
  • Imprint: Penguin General UK
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 464
  • RRP: $37.00

What Are You Looking At?




Refreshing, irreverent and always straightforward, What Are You Looking At? asks the basic questions that you were too afraid to ask.

What is modern art? Why do we either love it or loathe it? And why is it worth so much damn money? Join Will Gompertz on a dazzling tour that will change the way you look at modern art forever. From Monet's water lilies to Van Gogh's sunflowers, from Warhol's soup cans to Hirst's pickled shark, hear the stories behind the masterpieces, meet the artists as they really were, and discover the real point of modern art.
You will learn: not all conceptual art is bollocks; Picasso is king (but Cézanne is better); Pollock is no drip; Dali painted with his moustache; a urinal changed the course of art, why your five year-old really couldn't do it. Refreshing, irreverent and always straightforward, What Are You Looking At? asks all the basic questions that you were too afraid to ask. Your next gallery trip is going to be a little less intimidating and a lot more interesting.

  • Pub date: 13 June 2016
  • ISBN: 9780241965993
  • Imprint: Penguin General UK
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 464
  • RRP: $37.00

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Praise for What Are You Looking At?

“Will Gompertz is the best teacher you never had”

Will Gompertz

“Fascinating, fresh, energetic. A lively train-ride through modern art movements, beginning with Impressionism, ending with Banksy”

Scotsman

“Highly readable. Robert Hughes’s The Shock of the New redone à la Bill Bryson. Filters out all jargon and pretension and filters in plenty of fun. A richly detailed and highly entertaining history from Delacroix to Damien Hirst”

Daily Telegraph

“Energetic, comprehensive, refreshingly up-to-the-minute”

Observer

“Gompertz writes about difficult things without letting on that they are difficult. This romp through art from the 1860s to now is both hugely accessible and old-fashionedly educative”

Independent on Sunday

“Rattles along, powered by some astute observations”

Sunday Times, Books of the Year


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