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  • Published: 15 October 2001
  • ISBN: 9780375757914
  • Imprint: Random House US Group
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 224

The Man Who Was Thursday

A Nightmare



G. K. Chesterton's surreal masterpiece is a psychological thriller that centers on seven anarchists in turn-of-the-century London who call themselves by the names of the days of the week. Chesterton explores the meanings of their disguised identities in what is a fascinating mystery and, ultimately, a spellbinding allegory. As Jonathan Lethem remarks in his Introduction, The real characters are the ideas. Chesterton's nutty agenda is really quite simple: to expose moral relativism and parlor nihilism for the devils he believes them to be. This wouldn't be interesting at all, though, if he didn't also show such passion for giving the devil his due. He animates the forces of chaos and anarchy with every ounce of imaginative verve and rhetorical force in his body.

  • Published: 15 October 2001
  • ISBN: 9780375757914
  • Imprint: Random House US Group
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 224

About the author

G.K. Chesterton

G.K. Chesterton was born in London in 1874 and was educated at St Paul's School. He became a journalist and began writing for The Speaker with his friend Hilaire Belloc. His first novel, The Napoleon of Notting Hill, was published in 1904. In this book Chesterton developed his political attitudes in which he attacked socialism, big business and technology and showed how they become the enemies of freedom and justice. These were themes which were to run through his other works.

Chesterton converted to Catholicism in 1922. He explored his belief in his many religious essays and books. The best known is Orthodoxy, his personal spiritual odyssey.

His output was prolific. He wrote a great variety of books from biographies on Shaw and Dickens to literary criticism. He also produced poetry and many volumes of political, social and religious essays. His style is marked by vigour, puns, paradoxes and a great intelligence and personal modesty.

Chesterton is perhaps best known for his Father Brown stories. Father Brown is a modest Catholic priest who uses careful psychology to put himself in the place of the criminal in order to solve the crime.

Chesterton died in 1936.

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