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About the book
  • Published: 13 May 2011
  • ISBN: 9780241951484
  • Imprint: Penguin General UK
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 224
  • RRP: $26.00

A Room With A View




E.M.Forster's delightfully satiric comedy of manners A Room with a View is beautifully repackaged as part of the Penguin Essentials range.
'You love the boy body and soul, plainly, directly, as he loves you . . .'
Lucy has her rigid, middle-class life mapped out for her until she visits Florence with her uptight cousin Charlotte, and finds her neatly ordered existence thrown off balance.
Her eyes are opened by the unconventional characters she meets at the Pension Pertolini: flamboyant romantic novelist Eleanor Lavish, the Cockney Signora, curious Mr Emerson and, most of all, his passionate son George.
Lucy finds herself torn between the intensity of life in Italy and the repressed morals of Victorian England, personified in her terminally dull fiancé Cecil Vyse. Will she ever learn to follow her own heart?
A Room with a View is a sunny, brilliantly witty comedy of manners.
'He says, and even more implies, things that no other novelist does, and we can go on reading Forster indefinitely' The Times
'I loved it. My first intimation of the possibilities of fiction' Zadie Smith
Edward Morgan Forster was born in London in 1879. He studied at King's College, Cambridge. He wrote six novels, four of which appeared before the First World War, Where Angels Fear to Tread (1905), The Longest Journey (1907), A Room with a View (1908) and Howard's End (1910). An interval of fourteen years elapsed before he published A Passage to India. It won both the Prix Femina Vie Heuruse and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. He last novel, Maurice, was published posthumously in 1971. He also published two volumes of short stories and a number of non-fiction books. E. M. Forster died in 1970.

  • Pub date: 13 May 2011
  • ISBN: 9780241951484
  • Imprint: Penguin General UK
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 224
  • RRP: $26.00

About the Authors

E. M. Forster

Edward Morgan Forster was born in London in 1879, attended Tonbridge School as a day boy, and went on to King's College, Cambridge, in 1897. With King's he had a lifelong connection and was elected to an Honorary Fellowship in 1946. He declared that his life as a whole had not been dramatic, and he was unfailingly modest about his achievements. Interviewed by the BBC on his eightieth birthday, he said: 'I have not written as much as I'd like to... I write for two reasons: partly to make money and partly to win the respect of people whom I respect... I had better add that I am quite sure I am not a great novelist.' Eminent critics and the general public have judged otherwise and in his obituary The Times called him 'one of the most esteemed English novelists of his time'.

He wrote six novels, four of which appeared before the First World War, Where Angels Fear to Tread (1905), The Longest Journey (1907), A Room with a View (1908), and Howard's End (1910). An interval of fourteen years elapsed before he published A Passage to India. It won both the Prix Femina Vie Heureuse and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. Maurice, his novel on a homosexual theme, finished in 1914, was published posthumously in 1971. He also published two volumes of short stories; two collections of essays; a critical work, Aspects of the Novel; The Hill of Devi, a fascinating record of two visits Forster made to the Indian State of Dewas Senior; two biographies; two books about Alexandria (where he worked for the Red Cross in the First World War); and, with Eric Crozier, the libretto for Britten's opera Billy Budd. He died in June 1970.

Malcolm Bradbury

Malcolm Bradbury was born in Sheffield in 1932, and was educated at the University College of Leicester, Queen Mary College, London, Indiana University in the United States, and the University of Manchester. He was a Visiting Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford, has lectured at Birmingham University, and has been Professor of American Studies at the University of East Anglia since 1970.

One of our sharpest and most penetrating contemporary social satirists, Malcolm Bradbury is the author of the best-selling books Stepping Westward, Who Do You Think You Are? (a collection of short stories), The History Man and The After Dinner Game (a collection of his television plays). Rates of Exchange, his first novel since the classic The History Man, was shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 1983 and has firmly established him as one of Britain's major novelists.


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